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    Ruth Bader Ginsburg – our nation’s leading advocate of “equality under law” – has died, and her loss will be widely felt.

    Her impassioned and compelling judicial opinions – and dissents – which fought for (and advanced)  gender equality and rights for the disabled, and against stereotypic prejudices of all types, were landmarks in American social and political progress.

    A brilliant student, law professor and legal practitioner, she argued six cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and won five of them.  As the first female member of the prestigious Harvard Law Review, she raised the aspirations and motivations of generations that followed.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg – our nation’s leading advocate of “equality under law” – has died, and her loss will be widely felt.

    Her impassioned and compelling judicial opinions – and dissents – which fought for (and advanced)  gender equality and rights for the disabled, and against stereotypic prejudices of all types, were landmarks in American social and political progress.

    A brilliant student, law professor and legal practitioner, she argued six cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and won five of them.  As the first female member of the prestigious Harvard Law Review, she raised the aspirations and motivations of generations that followed.

    Ruth Bader Ginsburg – our nation’s leading advocate of “equality under law” – has died, and her loss will be widely felt.

    Her impassioned and compelling judicial opinions – and dissents – which fought for (and advanced)  gender equality and rights for the disabled, and against stereotypic prejudices of all types, were landmarks in American social and political progress.

    A brilliant student, law professor and legal practitioner, she argued six cases before the U.S. Supreme Court and won five of them.  As the first female member of the prestigious Harvard Law Review, she raised the aspirations and motivations of generations that followed.

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If it plays its cards right, Africa could become the world’s next major economic player within the next century, according to a recent report by theWorld Economic Forum. A bold statement indeed, but not an altogether unrealistic one for a continent housing six of the world’s fastest-growing economies, along with a population that is on track to double in the next 100 years. With massive Chinese investments in infrastructure, the eyes of big tech companies in the U.S., and the formation of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), Africa is already in the door of a promising era of growth and its transformation into the next manufacturing mecca — but it needs to be smart. Africa will need competent and accountable governance that prioritizes African development over foreign investment interest, as well as to continue expanding its infrastructure extensively to offer people basic services, connectivity and education, in order to establish itself as the world’s next business hub.

If it plays its cards right, Africa could become the world’s next major economic player within the next century, according to a recent report by theWorld Economic Forum. A bold statement indeed, but not an altogether unrealistic one for a continent housing six of the world’s fastest-growing economies, along with a population that is on track to double in the next 100 years. With massive Chinese investments in infrastructure, the eyes of big tech companies in the U.S., and the formation of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), Africa is already in the door of a promising era of growth and its transformation into the next manufacturing mecca — but it needs to be smart. Africa will need competent and accountable governance that prioritizes African development over foreign investment interest, as well as to continue expanding its infrastructure extensively to offer people basic services, connectivity and education, in order to establish itself as the world’s next business hub.

If it plays its cards right, Africa could become the world’s next major economic player within the next century, according to a recent report by theWorld Economic Forum. A bold statement indeed, but not an altogether unrealistic one for a continent housing six of the world’s fastest-growing economies, along with a population that is on track to double in the next 100 years. With massive Chinese investments in infrastructure, the eyes of big tech companies in the U.S., and the formation of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), Africa is already in the door of a promising era of growth and its transformation into the next manufacturing mecca — but it needs to be smart. Africa will need competent and accountable governance that prioritizes African development over foreign investment interest, as well as to continue expanding its infrastructure extensively to offer people basic services, connectivity and education, in order to establish itself as the world’s next business hub.

Projected view of Akon City.

Projected view of Akon City.

Projected view of Akon City.

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If it plays its cards right, Africa could become the world’s next major economic player within the next century, according to a recent report by theWorld Economic Forum. A bold statement indeed, but not an altogether unrealistic one for a continent housing six of the world’s fastest-growing economies, along with a population that is on track to double in the next 100 years. With massive Chinese investments in infrastructure, the eyes of big tech companies in the U.S., and the formation of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), Africa is already in the door of a promising era of growth and its transformation into the next manufacturing mecca — but it needs to be smart. Africa will need competent and accountable governance that prioritizes African development over foreign investment interest, as well as to continue expanding its infrastructure extensively to offer people basic services, connectivity and education, in order to establish itself as the world’s next business hub.

If it plays its cards right, Africa could become the world’s next major economic player within the next century, according to a recent report by theWorld Economic Forum. A bold statement indeed, but not an altogether unrealistic one for a continent housing six of the world’s fastest-growing economies, along with a population that is on track to double in the next 100 years. With massive Chinese investments in infrastructure, the eyes of big tech companies in the U.S., and the formation of the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA), Africa is already in the door of a promising era of growth and its transformation into the next manufacturing mecca — but it needs to be smart. Africa will need competent and accountable governance that prioritizes African development over foreign investment interest, as well as to continue expanding its infrastructure extensively to offer people basic services, connectivity and education, in order to establish itself as the world’s next business hub.

Loretta Lynch, who became this country’s first African American woman to be confirmed as U.S. Attorney General, is a prime example of what a strong will and determination can accomplish in America. Educated at Harvard University, acquiring a BA and then graduating from Harvard Law School with a JD, Lynch learned quickly how to lean in, stay fluid, and navigate the many moving parts and slippery slopes of a world predominantly reserved for whites males. Armed with a spirit that seemingly animates all moving parts, the former U.S. Attorney from Brooklyn, faced a grueling, drawn-out battle with Congress that took almost six months before the US Senate confirmed her as the first Black woman to lead the Justice Department. Urging her supporters to “Keep our minds and eyes on the prize”, Lynch stayed on course.

A Nation in Pain and a Promise of Hope

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Justice for the Taylor family was called into question after a grand jury refused to charge two of the three police officers, Sergeant Jon Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, with the killing of 26 year old emergency room technician, Breonna Taylor. The only indictment was handed to former Detective Bret Harkinson for allegedly firing blindly through a door and window. Harkinson’s bullets entered a neighbor’s apartment where a pregnant woman, a man, and a child were present.

Justice for the Taylor family was called into question after a grand jury refused to charge two of the three police officers, Sergeant Jon Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, with the killing of 26 year old emergency room technician, Breonna Taylor. The only indictment was handed to former Detective Bret Harkinson for allegedly firing blindly through a door and window. Harkinson’s bullets entered a neighbor’s apartment where a pregnant woman, a man, and a child were present.

Justice for the Taylor family was called into question after a grand jury refused to charge two of the three police officers, Sergeant Jon Mattingly and Detective Myles Cosgrove, with the killing of 26 year old emergency room technician, Breonna Taylor. The only indictment was handed to former Detective Bret Harkinson for allegedly firing blindly through a door and window. Harkinson’s bullets entered a neighbor’s apartment where a pregnant woman, a man, and a child were present.

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